Registry of online tools for Citizen Science

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In recent years, European (and international) biodiversity research and citizen science community have produced various applications for collecting, storing, managing, analysing and sharing of biodiversity data. These applications are usually available online as a part of webpages, portals and mobile applications, often funded by EU projects or national project funding instruments.
This repository contains more than 40 online tools and apps supporting citizen scientists initiatives and volunteer scientists in their study of nature. Some of these tools can help for identification or monitoring, others - to share and analyze available data, or to create and manage a new project.


FieldScope is a web-based platform that provides participants with the ability to visualise and analyse their own data using GIS software. It offers an easy-to-use interface and a set of analytic tools that are either familiar or easy for a novice to grasp.
Scale:
US
Taxa:

Fieldtrip GB is a mobile mapping and data capture app designed to support educational field trips and citizen science projects. The app has been developed by EDINA, based at The University of Edinburgh, with support from Jisc. Using a bespoke mash-up of OS Open data, Natural England data and OpenStreetMap data, the Fieldtrip GB app provides unique mobile mapping stack for Great Britain, optimized for rural areas.
Mobile app:
yes
Open Source:
Yes
Scale:
GB
Taxa:

The iBat programme has developed a smart-phone plugin to assist with global bat monitoring programme. With the help of an ultrasonic microphone, iBat allows volunteers to detect and record more than 900 species of bat. The captured sounds files are uploaded to a website that identifies each of the calls to build an accurate picture of bat populations. The tool iBatsID can identify calls recorded in Europe to species level.
Mobile app:
yes
Scale:
UK/World
Taxa:

iBats app which allows a smartphone to be directly connected to the ultrasonic detector and the geo-referenced sound files can then be automatically uploaded onto the iBat website, this replacing the need for a separate recording device, GPS and recording form.
Open Source:
yes
Scale:
World
Taxa:

A classification tool which uses ensembles of artificial neural networks (eANN's) to classify time-expanded recordings of bat echolocation calls from 34 European bat species.
Scale:
Europe
Taxa:

An online community of naturalists and citizen scientists built on sharing species observations via the iNaturalist website or from a mobile application. Data records may include images and geographical coordinates, and can be annotated by the community. Data with confirmed identifications are published through the GBIF. The app allows users to record observations with photos and GPS locations, view nearby photos on a map, keep track of updates
Mobile app:
Yes
Open Source:
yes
Scale:
World
Taxa:

Category:
Indicia provides a solution for developing online biological recording. A toolkit that simplifies the construction of websites, Indicia supports wildlife observation recording forms that are as simple or advanced as you need, allow photo upload, reporting, mapping and verification of the records.
Mobile app:
Yes
Open Source:
yes
Scale:
UK/Eu
Taxa:

Isoperla are the leading developers of wildlife apps in the British Isles and Europe. Isoperla apps are reinventing wildlife field guides for the mobile age. For example, our BirdSongId app identifies bird species from songs picked out of the air using the device microphone.
Mobile app:
Yes
Scale:
UK, Europe
Taxa:

iSpot is an online nature community that connects beginners with experts and fellow enthusiasts. Users can share images of what they have seen, identify species, discuss findings with other members and learn more about the wildlife. Selection of online identification tools is available.
Mobile app:
Yes
Open Source:
yes
Scale:
UK, World
Taxa:

Leafsnap is a series of electronic field guides. Leafsnap uses visual recognition software to help identify plant species from photographs. Citizens submit photos of leaves via the Leafsnap mobile app, which are automatically identified via a pattern-matching algorithm that compares the photo with photos of known leaves. The identification is passed back to the users.
Mobile app:
Yes
Open Source:
yes
Scale:
US
Taxa:

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